Gabrielle Gurley

Gabrielle Gurley is The American Prospect’s deputy editor. Her Twitter is @gurleygg, and her email is ggurley@prospect.org.

Recent Articles

Florida Wrestles with Election Cybersecurity

This purple state remains a plum target for hackers foreign and domestic, and its history of suppressive voting measures complicates efforts at reform. 

AP Photo/John Raoux Last May, Florida's Secretary of State Ken Dentzer declined a $20 million share of federal cybersecurity money, until Governor Rick Scott, pictured here speaking with Supporters in Orlando, forced him to accept it. This article appears in the Fall 2018 issue of The American Prospect magazine. Subscribe here . E ver since the infamous election of 2000, Florida has been ground zero in the struggle to improve the technology and security of voting. Unfortunately, those critical issues have been conflated with deliberate political efforts to suppress voting and undermine confidence in voting systems, and 2018 is no exception. The reforms instituted since the 2000 debacle, such as early voting, served to make voting more convenient and restored confidence that all votes would be counted accurately. Even Republican Governor Rick Scott, no fan of convenience or expanding the franchise, finally went along with online voter registration last year. Thanks to the work of...

The Collins Conundrum

Maine’s court of public opinion considers the case of Brett Kavanaugh—and of Susan Collins, too.

(AP Photo/Alex Brandon)
(AP Photo/Alex Brandon) Senator Susan Collins on Capitol Hill on October 3, 2018 S hortly after Brett Kavanaugh unleashed his apoplectic plea for a Supreme Court seat, a small group of women, some dressed in judges’ robes, arrived to protest in front of Senator Susan Collins’s house in Bangor, Maine. Had she been at home, she would have seen the women carrying signs urging her to vote no when Kavanaugh’s confirmation comes up for a vote in the Senate. Contrast that episode with Mainers’ reaction to seeing Collins at Bangor International Airport last summer. Deplaning from a Washington flight, Collins walked through the arrivals area into a round of applause from the assembled travelers after she’d help defeat her Senate colleagues’ attempts to repeal the Affordable Care Act. After more than 20 years in the Senate, she savored the once-in-a-career moment. Today, Collins is once again a pivotal vote on the nation’s future—and her own. After President Trump’s latest diatribe against the...

California Gears Up for a Gas Tax Clash

The Golden State is often a harbinger of trends to come, such as recently passed fuel taxes and vehicle fees to finance long-overdue local and state transportation projects. But these are now imperiled by an anti-tax ballot initiative. 

AP Photo/Richard Vogel Gasoline prices are displayed at a gas station near downtown Los Angeles screen_shot_2017-07-19_at_4.28.52_pm.png “ Your gas tax dollars at work/Rebuilding California, SB 1” signs have sprung up on transportation infrastructure repair and maintenance projects from the Mexican border to the Oregon line. Having $5 billion each year to fill potholes, shore up bridges, and pave roads is a pipe dream for most states. In 2017, California finally stopped imagining the “what-ifs” of transportation fixes and got to grips with its state-of-good-repair backlog. Governor Jerry Brown signed a new transportation revenue program into law in last April and the state officially hiked fuel taxes and vehicle fees last November. With little real money expected from a dysfunctional Washington, the onus for new revenues has shifted to states to figure out the best way to keep decay at bay. In California, the Democratic-controlled Legislature came up with a slate of investment...

Closing the New Affordable Housing Gaps

Low-income housing tax credits survived the Republicans’ draconian tax overhaul, but a lower corporate tax rate means investors have lost their appetite for the tax breaks that have helped build many of the country’s affordable housing projects.

AP Photo/Jeff Roberson A low-income housing complex under construction in St. Louis, Missouri R obert Goldman always kept close tabs on Capitol Hill tax talk. Reform proposals had been bopping around Capitol Hill in recent years, but nothing had happened. Before the 2016 election, the Montgomery Housing Partnership (MHP), a nonprofit affordable housing organization in Silver Spring, Maryland, that Goldman heads, had started the intricate financing process required to renovate Parkview Manor, a 1950s-era complex of more than 50 low-rise garden-style apartments that the nonprofit organization owns in Hyattsville, Maryland, a northeastern suburb of Washington. Designed for people of modest means, many housing developers see garden apartments as a tear-down-worthy relics of a bygone era. Luxury buildings with more and smaller apartments are all the rage now, ones that command higher rent than fewer dwellings on a larger tract of land can. But since MHP owns the affordable housing...

If He Can’t Build His Wall, Trump Won’t Build Anything Else

A West Virginia rally and an upcoming New Jersey event demonstrate again how Trump bamboozled America on one of his signature promises.

AP Photo/Alex Brandon President Donald Trump speaks during a rally in Charleston, West Virginia H igh on the list of Donald Trump’s false promises were his vows that his administration would “build gleaming new roads, bridges, highways, railways, and waterways all across our land.” This line, dropped into his 2018 State of the Union address, was just one more instance of Trump’s epic bamboozling. In the real world, where dollars get allocated, it’s members of Congress and state officials—not anyone in the administration—who are doing the heavy lifting. West Virginia’s country roads have been celebrated in song , but in real life they are some of the nation’s worst. A CNBC report ranked West Virginia at number five (tied with Maryland) in its list of states with the worst infrastructure, noting that almost half of its roads were in “poor” or “mediocre” condition. The Mountain State shot up to third in a 24/7 Wall Street survey that added high-risk dams and structurally-deficient...

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